Archive for the ‘Thailand’ Category

Nahm, Bangkok

November 6, 2013

A must-try in Bangkok – Thai for the michelin food tourists. So of course we had drinks prior at Sky bar. Thank you Hangover 2.

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Bo.lan, Bangkok

November 6, 2013

A visit to Bangkok in December last year to gate crash my brother-in-laws family wedding. Got to see my sister for some good times. There was some Thai fine dining. This sounds good in principle (the fine dining), but while the cuisine prides itself in its balance of flavours, a Thai tasting menu is a real assault on the body. Good in the moment, but not something you want to repeat anytime soon. This evening was most memorable for sitting next to some LA producer dudes straight off the plane who were ready to party….

I’m not even going to begin to describe the food. But it ticked all the boxes and we rolled out of there

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Likhit Kai Yaang, Bangkok

February 9, 2010

74/1 Thanon Ratchadamnoen Klang

This was a memorable meal. An absolute pain to get to, in an interesting part of town and as simple a dinner you can ask for, but it all translates to the important ‘memory value’ when you look back.

We were staying in a great hotel (The Metropolitan) who like many others cater for a discerning clientele who want the best of everything. We asked a few of the staff to provide directions to the Likhit Kai Yaang. They all knew it, seemingly from childhood, but couldn’t understand why with all the dining options in Bangkok we wanted to go there. Puzzlingly they all agreed it had the best grilled chicken. Yet, they were keen to direct us to closer, flasher restaurants.

Also working against us were taxi drivers who didn’t want to take us anyway. First of all they said they didn’t know where it was and when pushed, didn’t want to go for traffic reasons. It took three taxis. We perservered and ended up here:

It was boxing night at the stadium next door and we arrived to a buoyant place. Service was good – the staff laughing at the foreigners who demanded grilled chicken.

Clearly with all this build-up we couldn’t just order the chicken. So we opted for the Som Tum. It was as good an example I’ve had. a perfect combination of sweetness, heat, sourness and crunch with the fresh vegetables. So good we eventually had a second plate.

The chicken arrived. It did not disappointed. Grilled on a charcoal fire with a peppery sauce it was succulent and crispy. The owner made a note of coming round and checking we approved. All good fun.

Going off-piste I ordered grilled pork liver. I’m partial to a bit of offal, but this was pretty rich/full flavoured dish. I could only eat half of it. Yet it did nothing to take the shine of an extremely enjoyable meal.

The bill was small, but the laughs were many. We departed to explore a few more bars of Bangkok. Great city.

Chote Chitr, Bangkok

February 6, 2010

146 Th Phraeng Phuton, Banglamphu, Bangkok

We spent a few days in Bangkok over the Xmas period.  When I was here about six years ago, I was more interested in the night-life and experiencing (from a safe distance) the sights & sounds of this most manic of cities. Coming back with my wife, good bars & restaurants were on the agenda.

One of our first stops was Chote Chitr, a tiny restaurant which has received much attention from the international media, such as the New York Times.

The English sign shows this place is firmly on the tourist trail. No locals were sat at any of the six tables. But it didn’t really matter. The rest of the experience was pretty authentic, including the super cramped kitchen and an elderly woman being looked after in the middle of it all.

We stuck to the famed dishes and had a superb meal.

We started with a Mee Krob, a dish I hadn’t come across before – crispy fried noodles with a citrus glaze. It was sweet, crunchy with a clean heat. The accompanying greens & beansprouts offered a soft textural contrast, dulling the chilli build up. I’m not generally a fan of sweet food, but it was pretty fine and a dish you want to keep grazing on throughout the meal.

Next up was the standout dish:

Aubergine Salad. I’m going through a big of an aubergine phase at the moment, so I was already looking forward to it, but the depth of flavour extracted from the humble vegetable was brilliant. It had evidently been cooked on the smokiest of grills and then served luke warm. the only downer was the mass of chilli, which masked some of the flavour, but it was pretty fine and memorable.

Our next dish was a prawn red curry. This wasn’t exactly the most inspiring of orders; you can find this dish pretty much anywhere. It was a good and the prawns were fat, fresh & sweet. the sauce was hot. Nuff said really.

Another house special salad followed:

A banana flower salad. Again it was a perfect combination of sweetness & heat. Prawns & dried chilli provided the occasional surprise.

As much as I enjoy thai food, I think it’s easy to become a little overwhelmed by the constant heat of most dishes. Yet eating at Chote Chitr the spicing seems to work without it becoming too much of a chore to finish the dish. There are so many flavours & textures to take your mind of it. It’s clearly a place which is worthy of its profile in the travel press. Do not miss